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This is how you set up a heating schedule in the Fibaro Home Center

by crissxcross10. December 2014

It is getting cold outside. Perfect! It is finally time to “home automate”. … and this is how you can set up a heating schedule in the Fibaro Home Center – no matter if Lite or HC2, to have the perfect comfortable temperature at any desired time.

Due to the fact that there were some questions about this topic in the Forum, the following is going to be a little tutorial on how to set up a heating schedule in the Fibaro Home Center Lite, or HC2.

I have to admit that at the beginning, I had to search for a while until everything worked, as well. But once you understand the logical structure, you will get to orient yourself pretty fast. In principal, everything works like that:

  1. Heating Schedule – Set up Zone
  2. Deposit a Time Schedule to the Heating Zone.
  3. Assign the Heating Zone to one or several rooms
  4. Assign Heating Thermostat to the room
  5. Optionally assign a main temperature sensor to the room

This much for theory:

This is how it works Step by Step

First of all, you need a “zone”. You can set one up in the web surface of the Home Center under Control > Heating Control.

 Fibaro Home Center – Heating Control

Fibaro Home Center – Heating Control

Name this zone with a logical name. This way you will be able to assign it clearly. In most cases one heating zone per room is used. This makes sense, if you have a maisonette apartment, like we do. In this case the heating zones are applied across the rooms, because the rooms are opened at the top.

Fibaro Home Center – Create a Heating Zone

Fibaro Home Center – Create a Heating Zone

In the just created heating zone, time schedules can now be deposited, in which the time at that the room temperature is going to be set, is defined.

This is how the sections:

  • Morning
  • Day
  • Evening
  • Night

can be defined. I created a heating schedule for the children’s room in this example. At night the dwarf is supposed to be slumbering at 19,5 °C, in the early morning when he is awake the temperature is supposed to go back down, until noon, because that is when he is supposed to take his nap at 19,5 °C. In the afternoon the temperature can go down again, since the little one is playing in the living room. In the evening, when he is going to bed, sometime between 6 – 7 pm, the temperature is supposed to be 19,5 °C again, which will then stay until 9am.

 

Fibaro Home Center – Heating Control Time Schedules

Fibaro Home Center – Heating Control Time Schedules

This is how the respective temperatures can be set at certain times. The temperature stays as “given” until the point, where a new temperature is transmitted to the Danfoss Thermostat.

Thus, you do not have to edit a new heating schedule for every day over and over again, since the weekends and weekdays are similar to another, you can select check boxes for all the days the just created heating schedule is supposed to be applied, before saving.

Fibaro Home Center – Heating Control Time Schedules Weekday

Fibaro Home Center – Heating Control Time Schedules Weekday

In the next step, the heating zone, which now contains the heating schedule, needs to be linked to the room resp. the rooms. Back then, I was a little desperate at this point, because I totally oversaw the “Pencil Icon”. So after you created the heating schedules and saved them, click the pencil icon in the upper right corner of the window – on the right of the just created heating zone. A Pop-up is going to open, in which you can see your rooms. By activating the respective check box, you assign the room to the heating zone.

Every heating thermostat that is assigned tot he respective rooms will now be addressed by the heating schedule. The rooms can again be assigned to the respective thermostat under “module”.

Fibaro Home Center – Heating Control – Assign Rooms to the Zone

Fibaro Home Center – Heating Control – Assign Rooms to the Zone

It is not as if the Fibaro Home Center would tell the Danfoss Thermostat to go up to 19,5 °C at point 6pm, and the thermostat is immediately going to turn up the valve – no. In order to that, you need to understand the Z-Wave technique a little. The thermostat is a battery powered component and in order to hold up the battery life as high as possible, it steadily goes into a deep sleep. If you did not change anything in the default settings, the thermostat wakes up every 900 seconds (which is equivalent to 15 minutes) and asks:

“hey morning Fibaro Gateway – did I miss anything?”

Most of the time the Gateway says:

“nothing – go back to sleep!”

Then the Danfoss Thermostat:

“okay – rrrzzzz pffff rrrrzzz pffff”

If the heating schedule recognizes a change at 7pm, as in the example, the Fibaro Home Center is going to remember that a change is coming up. Then, the next time the thermostat wakes up and asks the Gateway if there is anything new, the Gateway will answer:

“yes – bring up the room temperature to 19,5 °C”

Due to the fact that Z-Wave is a two-way communication with backchannel, the thermostat is going to confirm that it understood the command:

“I got it, will be done – 19,5 °C Sir!”

These 15 minutes wakeup time could in the worst case lead to the waking up of the thermostat at 5:59pm, where there are no changes and so additional 14 minutes are going to go by until it wakes up and transmits the new temperature, which was already set at 6pm.

Fibaro Home Center – Assign Thermostat to the Room

Fibaro Home Center – Assign Thermostat to the Room

This wakeup time can be shortened in the menu under “Module” > select the Danfoss Thermostat > Tap “Expanded” under “Wakeup Interval (s):”.

Fibaro Home Center – Wakeup Time Danfoss Thermostat

Fibaro Home Center – Wakeup Time Danfoss Thermostat

The shorter the wakeup time, the more often the Thermostat is going to get in touch with the Fibaro Home Center – this also shortens the battery life, though.

In the default, the temperature is measured by the Danfoss Thermostate itself, which is pretty close to the heater. Though, the Danfoss itself is nowhere to be found as temperature sensor in the Fibaro Home Center! Due to the fact that it is more precisely to measure the temperature somewhere in the room itself and not at the heater, you can define a “The main temperature sensor” for every room. This can be done under: “Rooms” > select respective room > The main temperature sensor:

Fibaro Home Center – Define the main temperature sensor for each room

Fibaro Home Center – Define the main temperature sensor for each room

Besides that you can also define a Main-

  • Motion Sensor
  • Light Sensor
  • Heating Thermostat

for each room. Whoever owns a HC2, as well as the netatmo, can use them, as shown in the example screenshot, as main temperature sensor. I have two temperature sensors in the window contacts in my bedroom, though at the windows it mostly is 1°C to 2°C colder than in the room (you can find out how to integrate the temperature sensor into the window contact on here) that is why I use netatmo, which measures the temperature in the room. Alternatively, the Fibaro Motion Eye Eye can measure the temperature as well.

Fibaro Home Center – netatmo as main temperature sensor

Fibaro Home Center – netatmo as main temperature sensor

That is it – as I said, once you got behind the logic, the heating schedule is created pretty fast. If you want to save even more energy by sinking the temperature as soon as the window is opened – you can continue reading in our Fibaro-Forum weiterlesen: Fibaro Heating Control with Window Contact LUA

Linda translator

This text was translated by Linda

Hi! My name is Linda and I graduated high school with great interest in English language. I help with mein-cleveres-haus.de and translate texts for siio.de in my spare time.

You can read the original in German on siio.de.

About The Author
crissxcross
Hi, I'm crissxcross, qualified IT system electronics. Professionally, I work as a product marketing manager in the Smart Home. And private I am self a Smart Homie :-) If I do not sit in front of the monitor like I photograph and am a big fan of Apple. I am the founder of the SiiO.de blog.
  • fs1997
    fs1997
    10. December 2014 at 10:30

    Danke. Super Beitrag zum genau richtigen Zeitpunkt.
    Eine Frage, was ist der Unterschied beim Danfoss zwischen Aufwachintervall und Abfrage Zeitintervall?

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